jewish_recon_logo_0.jpg

Get Email Updates!

Teaching Reconstructionism

Learn about the philosophy of Reconstructionist Judaism in this self-paced, three-unit program. Explore the thinking of Rabbi Mordecai Kaplan, who understood Judaism as an evolving religious civilization. Find out how Reconstructionist Judaism differs from other branches of progressive Judaism. Hear the thoughts of real-world Reconstructionist rabbis and congregants. No Hebrew is required. You will discover the concept of Judaism as an “evolving religious civilization” and examine questions such as:

  • Are the Jews a “chosen people?”
  • In a scientific age, how do I understand evil and suffering?
  • What obligation do I have to help heal the world (tikkun olam)?
  • How do I decide which Jewish holidays or rituals to observe?

Each unit presents one of the fundamental perspectives of Reconstructionist Judaism established by the movement’s intellectual founder, Rabbi Mordecai Kaplan: belonging, believing and behaving.

Your guide for the program is Rabbi Nancy Fuchs Kreimer, Ph.D., ’82, director of multifaith studies and initiatives at RRC. You have opportunities to read, question and reflect on Judaism in the 21st century, as you move through at your own pace and explore probing questions.

Register or login>>

 

You have opportunities to read, question and reflect on Judaism in the 21st century, as you move through at your own pace and explore probing questions.

A Discussion About Teaching Hanukkah: Miracle or Not?

These conversations from the listserv for Reconstructionist educators were prompted by a question from Toni Bloomberg Grossman about how to teach young children about Hanukkah. Many educators responded with their practical and ideological thoughts about how to teach Hanukkah.
Type: Listserve Thread

Proposal for a Reconstructionist Day School

Rabbi Shira Stutman (RRC '07) conceived of this model for a Reconstructionist high school that she named Lab Yeshiva. She proposes block scheduling, integrated secular and Jewish studies, and service-learning to Jewishly educate students who are not well served by traditional college-prep academies.
Type: Program Description

Pages